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Many owners appear disappointed that their young puppy will not toilet when out on a walk, yet relieves itself the second it gets back home. This is because the puppy has been taught to toilet only at home (hopefully in its garden), and being creatures of habit, they often wait until they have returned home before evacuating their bladder and/ or bowels.
I bought one of their books which is fine... Really disliked how they give you the "free" Elite Dog Club for one month then automatically charge your card $37 a month after. I went on there anyways to check it out while it was free for me. Personally it wasn't something I would pay $37 a month for so I canceled the subscription before they billed me. During the 2nd step of the 3 step process to cancel they offered me a ONE TIME FEE OF $37 TO HAVE A LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP!!! This upsets me because I'm sure there are people that enjoy this site and these poor loyal customers are being taken advantage of.
When it comes to house training, you don’t have to be a scientist to work out what goes in must come out. If you feed your puppy a quality, balanced dog food and stick to regular meal times (3 times a day for young puppies, dropping down to twice a day for older dogs), then your puppy is more likely to have regular toileting habits – which means you’ll have more of an idea of what time to take him out. If, on the other hand, you offer your puppy constant treats and tidbits and feed him at different times of the day, you can expect your puppy to need to toilet at any time of day too.
Hi Gayla, Thank you for your order. Sorry to learn that you have not received access to the Australian Shepherd membership site. I have forwarded your query to our Customer Support team and they will get in touch with you in the next 24 hours. Just in case, you don't get an email from them, please email to info@trainpetdog.com. Thanks again for your patience. Regards Team - TrainPetDog.com
Head halters are an alternative to collars that works similarly to a horse halter. The halter fits over the dog's snout and behind its head (leading it to sometimes be mistaken for a muzzle). Halters reduce the dog's ability to successfully pull on the leash, but do not eliminate it. If the halter is used with a sharp jerk on the leash, neck injury to the dog may result, but used correctly head halters have not been shown to cause harm.
Dogs that demonstrate the previously mentioned basic skills, as well as walking reasonably well on a leash and a few other minor tasks, can be tested for and earn the American Kennel Club's (AKC) Canine Good Citizen certification. While not a competitive obedience title, a CGC certification demonstrates that the dog is sociable, well behaved, and reliable in public settings.[1] Some insurance companies will waive breed restrictions on dogs with CGCs, and many states have passed resolutions supporting and encouraging CGC certification as a yardstick for canine manners and responsible dog ownership.

Any area that the pup has access to must be kept clear and clean. Put out of puppy's reach anything you don't want him to chew or destroy. Do not allow your puppy to have unsupervised access to 'unchewables.' Do not chase the puppy in an attempt to take something away. Instead provide puppy with her own toys and teach her how to play with them exclusively.
Hi Karon, Sorry to learn about your experience. First and foremost, we don't have any offer of $1.00 for 3 days. We offer Elite Dog Club membership free with our Dog Lovers Training course. You may opt out of it during ordering - so you are not forced to have any recurring payment product from us. And even if you subscribe to it, you can always cancel it within the first 30 days and not be charged at all. I am sorry to learn that your cancelation didn't take into effect. Can you please email to info@trainpetdog.com? We need you email ID to track the order and refund the payments.
There are a lot of different ways to train your dog. You may choose to sign up for a dog training class, hire a professional dog trainer for private lessons, or even send your dog to board with a trainer. However, plenty of people successfully train their dogs on their own. It's a great way to save money on training costs, and a wonderful way to bond with your dog.
At a basic level, owners want dogs with which they can pleasantly share a house, a car, or a walk in the park. Some dogs need only a minimum amount of training to learn to eliminate outside (be housebroken), to sit, to lie down, or to come on command (obey a recall). Many other dogs prove more challenging. New dog owners might find training difficult and fail to make progress, because they expect dogs to think and act like humans, and are surprised and baffled when the dogs don't.
Success is usually attained in small steps. Training sessions with your dog should last 10 to 15 minutes, two to three times per day. This is especially true for puppies because of their very short attention spans. Longer sessions can cause an adult dog to become bored. Start by teaching basic commands. Try to stick with one action per training session so your dog does not get confused.

We will try our best to make sure you see the same coaches each week for your classes, because we think it is important for us to get to know you and your puppy. The coaches work in teams of three, so you should get to know all the team members over your course. Occasionally there may be a change in one coach because of sickness or holidays, but if this is necessary, we will try to ensure that you are introduced to your new coach the week before the change so that they are familiar with you and your dog.

In recent years, a new form of Obedience competition, known as Rally Obedience, has become very popular. It was originally devised by Charles L. "Bud" Kramer from the obedience practice of "doodling" - doing a variety of interesting warmup and freestyle exercises. Rally Obedience is designed to be a "bridge", or intermediate step, between the CGC certification and traditional Obedience competition.

The clicker is a small hand-held device that makes a distinct, short sound to mark a desired behavior. (See clicker training for a more detailed discussion of this methodology.) It has gained popularity in recent years as being a means of training that does not involve physically correcting the dog, though it may be used in conjunction with these methods.


If you’re a bit of a control freak and you expect your puppy to have mastered all of your commands in the first couple of weeks, you may be disappointed. Young puppies, in particular, have a lot to take in in the first few weeks as they settle into their new home away from their mom and litter mates. Start off with two or three commands at the most – sit, come and down should take priority – and don’t move on to new commands until such time as your puppy has mastered the basics.
The clicker is a small hand-held device that makes a distinct, short sound to mark a desired behavior. (See clicker training for a more detailed discussion of this methodology.) It has gained popularity in recent years as being a means of training that does not involve physically correcting the dog, though it may be used in conjunction with these methods.
Electronic collars (also known as E-collars) transmit a remote signal from a control device the handler operates to the collar. An electrical impulse is transmitted by the handler remotely, at varying degrees of intensity, from varying distances depending on range frequency. It is also done automatically in the bark electronic collar to stop excessive barking, and invisible fence collar when the dog strays outside its boundary. Electronic collars are widely used in some areas of the world and by some dog obedience professionals. This technique remains a source of controversy with many dog training associations, veterinary associations and kennel clubs.[6]
A small handful of companies selling products in this category work with charities and organisations to support the health and welfare of dogs in society.  Train Pet Dog was developed by the Dog Training Institute.  They work to develop innovative, cutting edge dog training methods from around the world that can be passed on to customers in the form of the dog training course.  They are also proud supporters of The Human Society of the United States, the ASPCA, the IPDTA (The International Positive Dog Training Association) and NICE, the National Institute of Canine Experts.  The Dog Training Institute actively campaigns against all forms of animal cruelty everywhere, as well as that against dogs.
  "Well, then, Griff, I pity you, from my soul. I would rather have had asharp struggle for the happiness that I shall now obtain so easily, thanthat you should be thus cruelly disappointed. But you cannot blame me,my friend, that I avail myself of fortune's favor. Miss Plowden, yourfair hand. Colonel Howard, I return you a thousand thanks for the careyou have taken, hitherto, of this precious charge; and believe me, sir,that I speak frankly, when I say, that, next to myself, I should chooseto entrust her with you in preference to any man on earth."
Slip collars (commonly called choke chain or check chains) are made of metal links or rolled material such as nylon or leather. A metal ring is at each end. Historically, slip collars have been used as a matter of course, mostly in North America and the UK. In the last few decades use of these collars has declined. Correctly used, the collar should make a quick clicking not zipping sound when quickly snapped and released to startle or get the attention of the dog and indicate to the handler that the technique was a swift jerk not a choke. The idea is not to strangle the dog, though this can happen if the collar is improperly used.
  "I bear no commission from any quarter," returned the Pilot; "I rankonly an humble follower of the friends of America; and having led thesegentlemen into danger, I have thought it my duty to see them extricated.They are now safe; and the right to command all that hear me rests withMr. Griffith, who is commissioned by the Continental Congress for suchservice."
Dogs Trust Dog School is different from other dog training classes you may have been to. We are passionate about dog behaviour and want to help you teach your puppy or dog to fit happily into your family life. That means doing some basic training of course – he needs to learn to sit when asked, walk with you on a loose lead and come back when you call. But that isn’t all. At Dog School, we also help your dog learn how to behave in everyday situations, such as when you pass other dogs, stop to talk to people in the street, or need him to settle down when you’re busy. Dog School is also about making sure you develop a strong bond with your dog, understand his or her behaviour, and know how to react when things don’t go according to plan. We set up the classes to make you and your dog feel as relaxed and confident as possible, so you can both make the most of all the new information and experiences that you will have with us at Dogs Trust Dog School.
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