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In the twentieth century, formalized dog training originated in military and police applications, and the methods used largely reflected the military approach to training humans. In the middle and late part of the century, however, more research into operant conditioning and positive reinforcement occurred as wild animal shows became more popular. Aquatic mammal trainers used clickers (a small box that makes a loud click when pushed on) to "mark" desired behavior, giving food as a reward. The change in training methods spread gradually into the world of dog training. Today many dog trainers rely heavily on positive reinforcement to teach new behaviors.

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Slip collars (commonly called choke chain or check chains) are made of metal links or rolled material such as nylon or leather. A metal ring is at each end. Historically, slip collars have been used as a matter of course, mostly in North America and the UK. In the last few decades use of these collars has declined. Correctly used, the collar should make a quick clicking not zipping sound when quickly snapped and released to startle or get the attention of the dog and indicate to the handler that the technique was a swift jerk not a choke. The idea is not to strangle the dog, though this can happen if the collar is improperly used.

Positive reinforcement is the key to success. A common mistake is to punish your dog during training or become angry. This will only cause confusion. You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired. Try to end sessions on a positive note. Eventually, successful training will be achieved with patience and consistency.

To join a DTC you don’t have to register your dog with the Kennel Club, nor to enter Exemption Shows. However, when you compete in Club Matches with other KC registered clubs or enter Limit or Open Shows, your dog has to be registered (even rescue dogs, and crossbreeds have to be registered in their case, under the Obedience and Working Trials register).
  "Stand back, young man," said Miss Howard, repulsing his familiarattempt to take her arm; and then advancing, with a maidenly dignity,nigher to her guardian, she continued, "I cannot know what stipulationshave been agreed to by my cousin Plowden, in the secret treaty she hasmade this night with Mr. Barnstable: this for myself, Colonel Howard, Iwould have you credit your brother's child when she says, that to her,the events of the hour have not been more unexpected than to yourself."

  Katherine waited not to hear the close of this sentence, but walked to adistant part of the room to conceal the burning blushes that coveredher countenance. The manner in which the plans of Barnstable had becomeknown to his foe was no longer a mystery. Her conscience also reproachedher a little with some unnecessary coquetry, as she remembered thatquite one-half of the dialogue between her lover and herself, under theshadow of that very wall to which Borroughcliffe alluded, had been on asubject altogether foreign to contention and tumults. As the feelings ofBarnstable were by no means so sensitive as those of his mistress, andhis thoughts much occupied with the means of attaining his object, hedid not so readily comprehend the indirect allusion of the soldier, butturned abruptly away to Griffith, and observed with a serious air:


Training clubs that run the Kennel Club Good Citizen Dog Scheme - the largest dog training programme in the UK are a sensible place to begin. Here you will learn about every aspect of dog ownership from the Puppy Foundation Courses through to Bronze, Silver and Gold award levels. Go to GCDS Training Clubs in your County to find one near to you or email the GCDS Team (gcds@thekennelclub.org.uk) or call 0207 518 1011.
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