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I requested everything I already listed, but you disputed and did not refund any money, everything was done before the 120 days, but you did not acknowledge any of my request, I do not mind to pay for the pain book, nothing elite, and nothing interesting either, but all the other charges you did not refund, you probably cancel the subscription but never give me ANY REFUND!!! You sound like an angel, but your company only sucks money from honest people. DO NOT DO BUSINESS WITH THIS OUTFIT, ready all other reviews!!!!!!!! All the same, they just keep your money!!!!!!!!!

Hi Gayla, Thank you for your order. Sorry to learn that you have not received access to the Australian Shepherd membership site. I have forwarded your query to our Customer Support team and they will get in touch with you in the next 24 hours. Just in case, you don't get an email from them, please email to info@trainpetdog.com. Thanks again for your patience. Regards Team - TrainPetDog.com


Martingale collars (also called limited-slip collars) are usually made of flat nylon with a smaller fixed-length section (made of either nylon or a short length of chain) that, when pulled on by the leash, shortens up tightening the collar around the dog's neck, to a limited extent. When properly fitted, martingales are looser than flat-buckle collars when not tightened, and less severely corrective than slip collars when tightened.


So I read this companies response back to me and it asks me to send them some info so I find my original info for the purchase to prove I bought the training stuff and copied and pasted the email she gave me so there would be no mistake... AND IT BOUNCED BACK AT ME IMMEDIATELY!! Really??? You gave me an email that doesn't work? And this is suppose to assure me that you are a reputable company and that you are going to fix the problem and give me the link so I can use the product I bought??? Seriously???
No breed is impossible to obedience train, but novice owners might find training some breeds quite difficult. The capacity to learn basic obedience—and even complicated behavior—is inherent in all dogs. Some breeds may require more patience or creativity in training than others. Individual dogs that exhibit fearful or anxious behaviors should also be handled with greater care, and especially not trained using harsh corrective methods, as this training can be psychologically harmful to the dog and result in further behavioral issues.[3][4]
The leash or lead is used to connect the dog to the handler, lead the dog, as well as to control the dog in urban areas. Most communities have laws which prohibit dogs from running at large. They may be made of any material such as nylon, metal or leather. A six-foot length is commonly used for walking and in training classes, though leashes come in lengths both shorter and longer. A long line (also called a lunge line) can be 3 metres (ten feet) or more in length, and are often used to train the dog to come when called from a distance.

  "Stand back, young man," said Miss Howard, repulsing his familiarattempt to take her arm; and then advancing, with a maidenly dignity,nigher to her guardian, she continued, "I cannot know what stipulationshave been agreed to by my cousin Plowden, in the secret treaty she hasmade this night with Mr. Barnstable: this for myself, Colonel Howard, Iwould have you credit your brother's child when she says, that to her,the events of the hour have not been more unexpected than to yourself."
In competition, merely sitting, lying down, or walking on a leash are insufficient. The dog and handler must perform the activities off leash and in a highly stylized and carefully defined manner. For example, on a recall, the dog must come directly to the handler, without sniffing or veering to one side, and must sit straight in front of the handler, not at an angle or off to one side or the other. Training for obedience competitions builds on basic obedience training.
  "Ha!" exclaimed Borroughcliffe, grasping a pistol, with an air ofgreat resolution, "the work thickens--I had not included this man inmy estimate of their numbers. Is he a Samson, that his single arm canchange the face of things so suddenly! Down with your own weapon, youmasquerader! or, at the report of this pistol, your body shall be made atarget for twenty bullets."
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Slip collars (commonly called choke chain or check chains) are made of metal links or rolled material such as nylon or leather. A metal ring is at each end. Historically, slip collars have been used as a matter of course, mostly in North America and the UK. In the last few decades use of these collars has declined. Correctly used, the collar should make a quick clicking not zipping sound when quickly snapped and released to startle or get the attention of the dog and indicate to the handler that the technique was a swift jerk not a choke. The idea is not to strangle the dog, though this can happen if the collar is improperly used.
  The roaring of a tempest was not louder than the shout that burst fromhis followers, who continued their cheers, peal on peal, until the veryroof of the edifice appeared to tremble with their vibrations. Numerousdark and shaggy heads were seen moving around the passage; some casedin the iron-bound caps of the frigate's boarders, and others glitteringwith the brazen ornaments of her marine guard. The sight of the latterdid not fail to attract the eye of Manual, who rushed among the throng,and soon reappeared, followed by a trusty band of his own men, who tookpossession of the post held by the soldiers of Borroughcliffe, while thedialogue was continued between the leaders of the adverse parties.

Head halters are an alternative to collars that works similarly to a horse halter. The halter fits over the dog's snout and behind its head (leading it to sometimes be mistaken for a muzzle). Halters reduce the dog's ability to successfully pull on the leash, but do not eliminate it. If the halter is used with a sharp jerk on the leash, neck injury to the dog may result, but used correctly head halters have not been shown to cause harm.


Martingale collars (also called limited-slip collars) are usually made of flat nylon with a smaller fixed-length section (made of either nylon or a short length of chain) that, when pulled on by the leash, shortens up tightening the collar around the dog's neck, to a limited extent. When properly fitted, martingales are looser than flat-buckle collars when not tightened, and less severely corrective than slip collars when tightened.
The clicker is a small hand-held device that makes a distinct, short sound to mark a desired behavior. (See clicker training for a more detailed discussion of this methodology.) It has gained popularity in recent years as being a means of training that does not involve physically correcting the dog, though it may be used in conjunction with these methods.

Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.

Just as a child needs a caring parent; an athletic team needs a coach; your puppy needs a leader and a clear social hierarchy. If you do not take up the role of leader, your dog will; and you will end up with an unruly, disobedient dog. Many people try to win their new puppy's love by letting the puppy always have its way. Buckets of affection is a wonderful thing for most puppies, but it must be tempered with respect.
Before enrolling with a particular club contact them and ask if you can go to watch a class without your dog. This will help you decide if this is the right environment for you and your dog. Some clubs have waiting lists and you will need to book ahead, some accept people on a roll on roll off basis. Prices will vary from a joining fee and then weekly payments to a one off fee for a certain length of training.
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