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Dogs Trust Dog School is different from other dog training classes you may have been to. We are passionate about dog behaviour and want to help you teach your puppy or dog to fit happily into your family life. That means doing some basic training of course – he needs to learn to sit when asked, walk with you on a loose lead and come back when you call. But that isn’t all. At Dog School, we also help your dog learn how to behave in everyday situations, such as when you pass other dogs, stop to talk to people in the street, or need him to settle down when you’re busy. Dog School is also about making sure you develop a strong bond with your dog, understand his or her behaviour, and know how to react when things don’t go according to plan. We set up the classes to make you and your dog feel as relaxed and confident as possible, so you can both make the most of all the new information and experiences that you will have with us at Dogs Trust Dog School.
Limit , Open and Championship Shows are run ‘by the Kennel Club’ and ‘Under Kennel Club Rules’. Each Show will have a ‘Closing Date’ for entries a few weeks before the actual event, which means you must pre-book your place, and pre-pay your entrance fee. Classes at these Shows are known as Pre-Beginner, Beginner, Novice, ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’, and Championship ‘C’ (in ascending order of ability / experience), and the ‘Tests’ to be performed for each of these Classes is predefined in the Kennel Club rules. In general you have to win twice in a lower class to progress on to the next level. Only winners of the Championship ‘C’ Class (which are only at Championship Shows) go on to compete at Crufts.
Success is usually attained in small steps. Training sessions with your dog should last 10 to 15 minutes, two to three times per day. This is especially true for puppies because of their very short attention spans. Longer sessions can cause an adult dog to become bored. Start by teaching basic commands. Try to stick with one action per training session so your dog does not get confused.
Puppies are capable of learning simple commands from a very young age but don’t try to give your puppy a meaningful training session if he is tired, highly excited or busy exploring. You need his full attention, otherwise you’re wasting your time. You can build up to training sessions in more distracting environments once your puppy is reliably responding to your commands at home.
You may also notice common behavior problems in your dog such as jumping up, barking, or even aggression. The best way to correct any misbehavior is to interrupt it. Shift your dog's attention to something positive. Try running through cues that your dog has mastered followed by rewards. Keep your demeanor cool and confident, and be clear about what you mean.
Often, the sit command will be one of the easiest for your dog to learn first. Next, you can train your dog to lie down. At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay. In addition, your dog should be trained to come when called as soon as possible. This is one of the most important fundamental commands. Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.
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When you arrive to class we ask that you keep your distance from other owners and dogs, we will guide you over to your personal ‘pod’ which will be a small area reserved for you and your dog. This will give your dogs the best chance to feel comfortable and calm at the start of class. Once everyone has settled in their own areas your coach will start the class, there will be some time set aside for practical training and discussing key messages. In puppy classes there will also be some time scheduled for socialising with other class members.
Certain breeds, such as Doberman Pinschers, German Shepherds, Border Collies, Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, have reputations as being easier to train than others, such as some hounds and sled dogs. Dogs that have been bred to perform one task to the exclusion of all others (such as the Bloodhound or Husky), or that have been bred to work independently from their handler (such as terriers), may be particularly challenging with obedience training.[2]
Clicker training, a common form of positive reinforcement, is a simple and effective dog training method. Although it is still fine to train your dog without clicker training, many people find it helpful. With clicker training, you can easily and effectively teach your dog all kinds of basic and advanced commands and tricks. It's fast and easy to learn how to clicker train your dog
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