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Then there is the member's only forum where you can chat with other dog owners and share your thoughts and experiences.  You can post your questions on here and other members will answer.  The free bonus is the "How to Look After Your Dog's Health" e-book guide.  This product is pumped full of wonderful features, covers a variety of media with effective use of the internet, and provides plenty of opportunity for feedback and customer support.  At only $37 dollars it compares amazingly to the other products, in terms of quality, features and value for money. Why not give Train Pet Dog a try?

Dogs Trust Dog School’s experienced trainers aim to provide high quality, welfare friendly advice on dog training and behaviour during our fun, educational classes. We want to help dog owners to form a life-long bond with their dogs, have a good understanding of the behaviour of their dog and avoid the common pitfalls that can lead to problem behaviours.

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Dog training classes or private sessions can also be an addition to your own training program. The dog trainer can help you improve the program and customize it to your dog's learning style. Try to be as involved as possible when it comes to your dog's training. You and your dog will be a stronger team when you are directly involved in the training process.
  "'Tis lost," returned the Pilot, hastily--"'tis sacrificed to moreprivate feelings; 'tis like a hundred others, ended in disappointment,and is forgotten, sir, forever. But the interests of the Republics mustnot be neglected, Mr. Griffith.--Though we are not madly to endangerthe lives of those gallant fellows, to gain a love-smile from one youngbeauty, neither are we to forget the advantages they may have obtainedfor us, in order to procure one of approbation from another. ThisColonel Howard will answer well in a bargain with the minions of theCrown, and may purchase the freedom of some worthy patriot who isdeserving of his liberty. Nay, nay, suppress that haughty look, and turnthat proud eye on any, rather than me; he goes to the frigate, sir, andthat immediately."
  "I bear no commission from any quarter," returned the Pilot; "I rankonly an humble follower of the friends of America; and having led thesegentlemen into danger, I have thought it my duty to see them extricated.They are now safe; and the right to command all that hear me rests withMr. Griffith, who is commissioned by the Continental Congress for suchservice."
Our training classes are aimed at giving you information and skills that you can apply to your puppy’s behaviour in any situation. If you have an existing issue that would require help with please contact your local coach and describe the problems you are having. It may be possible for us to help you in a class setting, or it may be that your coach will recommend a 1-1 session with a trainer or behaviourist. We will aim to give you the advice that we believe will be of the greatest benefit to you and your dog. In some cases, the class environment may not be the most suitable for your dog, in which case we will always strive to offer an alternative plan of action!
Electronic collars (also known as E-collars) transmit a remote signal from a control device the handler operates to the collar. An electrical impulse is transmitted by the handler remotely, at varying degrees of intensity, from varying distances depending on range frequency. It is also done automatically in the bark electronic collar to stop excessive barking, and invisible fence collar when the dog strays outside its boundary. Electronic collars are widely used in some areas of the world and by some dog obedience professionals. This technique remains a source of controversy with many dog training associations, veterinary associations and kennel clubs.[6]

The leash or lead is used to connect the dog to the handler, lead the dog, as well as to control the dog in urban areas. Most communities have laws which prohibit dogs from running at large. They may be made of any material such as nylon, metal or leather. A six-foot length is commonly used for walking and in training classes, though leashes come in lengths both shorter and longer. A long line (also called a lunge line) can be 3 metres (ten feet) or more in length, and are often used to train the dog to come when called from a distance.


Obedience training usually refers to the training of a dog and the term is most commonly used in that context. Obedience training ranges from very basic training, such as teaching the dog to reliably respond to basic commands such as "sit," "down," "come," and "stay," to high level competition within clubs such as the American Kennel Club, United Kennel Club and the Canadian Kennel Club, where additional commands, accuracy and performance are scored and judged.
When it comes to house training, you don’t have to be a scientist to work out what goes in must come out. If you feed your puppy a quality, balanced dog food and stick to regular meal times (3 times a day for young puppies, dropping down to twice a day for older dogs), then your puppy is more likely to have regular toileting habits – which means you’ll have more of an idea of what time to take him out. If, on the other hand, you offer your puppy constant treats and tidbits and feed him at different times of the day, you can expect your puppy to need to toilet at any time of day too.
With your dog sitting at your side, set off and give the command “heel” (so that your dog is aware you are about to move). If the dog gets ahead, stop and encourage it back to your side with a titbit. Repeat. To begin with, stop every three to four paces to praise your dog and give a titbit. Do not use your voice unless your dog is at your side. You can also practise this off-lead in a secure area – this makes you work really hard at keeping your dog with you, rather than relying on the lead.
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